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Facts and FAQs: Surrey LRT

Have a question about LRT? Look here or contact us at transportation@surrey.ca.

Frequently Asked Questions

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  • What is light rail transit? expand
  • What is light rail transit?

    Light Rail Transit (LRT) is a high-quality form of rapid transit that typically runs at street level in lanes separate from regular traffic, and offers a smooth, comfortable and quiet ride. It runs using electricity and is operated by a driver.

    Used widely throughout North America and around the world, LRT trains carry large numbers of passengers and are capable of travelling at high speeds.

    Stations are street level, and will typically be located in the centre of the road with pedestrian crossings for passengers. Street-level stations allow passengers a very easy, "hop-on, hop-off" service, making transit accessible for people of all ages and abilities. Stations have shelters and typically have ticket vending machines, closed-circuit TV for security, seating, real-time schedule information, and wayfinding information.

    LRT diagram

    Graphic showing the elements of light rail transit.

  • Why Is LRT the right choice for Surrey? expand
  • Why Is LRT the right choice for Surrey?

    Technical work completed from 2010 to 2013 examined numerous rapid transit alternatives and shortlisted several options, including a 27-km LRT network. Based on this work, the Mayors' of Metro Vancouver endorsed light rail in 2014 for its quality of service, capacity, relative affordability compared to other alternatives and the fit with Surrey’s long-term community plans.

    On Nov. 23, 2016, the Mayors' Council and TransLink Board of Directors approved implementation of Phase 1 of the 10-Year Investment Plan, securing regional funding, which along with the previously-secured federal and provincial funding, means continued planning, early works, consultation and preparatory work on the Surrey-Newton-Guildford LRT is moving forward. Visit the TransLink SNG Project site to find out more.

    Take a look at Surrey's Vision for LRT.

  • Why not SkyTrain or Bus Rapid Transit for Surrey? expand
  • Why not SkyTrain or Bus Rapid Transit for Surrey?

    Bus Rapid Transit

    • With Surrey's growing population, BRT is a short-term solution that would be unable to provide sufficient capacity to meet forecast demand in the corridor by 2041;
    • BRT vehicles are typically 22m long, newer longer vehicles can reach up to 30m. LRT vehicle lengths far exceed these lengths, and fit better with Surrey's projected growth.

    SkyTrain

    • Costs approximately twice the price of 27-km of LRT;
    • The elevated guideway and stations of SkyTrain would have a negative visual impact in the city;
    • The capacity far exceeds Surrey's future needs;
    • Fewer stations means fewer opportunities to access the places you want to go.

    LRT has the greatest potential to spark development, build vibrant communities, and attract investment.

  • What other cities have LRT? expand
  • What other cities have LRT?

    While light rail transit will be a new technology to British Columbia, across North America and around the world, LRT is increasingly being used to make rapid transit part of the community fabric with more accessible, street-level stops that are safely integrated with urban streets and neighbourhoods.

    LRT operates in nearly 390 cities around the world. There are nearly 30 existing LRT systems in Canada and the US, and more than a dozen new LRT lines being planned or constructed. Edmonton, Calgary, and Ottawa have LRT, and a Kitchener/Waterloo system is currently under construction. Learn more about LRT projects on the go.

  • What will happen to traffic? expand
  • What will happen to traffic?

    King George Boulevard, 104 Avenue, and Fraser Highway are heavily travelled thoroughfares, and currently face congestion challenges. Without an effective rapid transit system this will only get worse as the population grows. One of the key benefits of LRT is that it will provide a fast, frequent and reliable alternative to driving, and put 195,000 more people within walking distance of rapid transit in Surrey and Langley (City & Township). More people using transit means fewer vehicles on the road.

  • How will the project be funded? expand
  • How will the project be funded?


    TransLink and Surrey are working to secure full project funding and ensuring we’re ready to build the project once funding is confirmed. We’ve successfully passed a key step in securing federal funding, with recent confirmation that the project is progressing through the P3 Canada Fund process. It’s important to keep moving forward with planning while the region continues to look for ways to fund the project’s remaining share.

    On Nov. 23, 2016, the Mayors' Council and TransLink Board of Directors approved implementation of Phase 1 of the 10-Year Investment Plan, securing regional funding, which along with the previously-secured federal and provincial funding, means continued planning, early works, consultation and preparatory work on the Surrey-Newton-Guildford LRT is moving forward. Visit the TransLink SNG Project site to find out more.

  • Where will LRT go? expand
  • Where will LRT go?

    The LRT network will span 27 kilometres with two lines and approximately 19 stops. The regional Mayors’ Council Vision for Transportation and Transit and Surrey’s Official Community Plan both show LRT on the following corridors:

    • Phase 1 - Surrey-Newton-Guildford Line: Surrey-Newton-Guildford Line on King George Boulevard and 104 Avenue between Guildford, Surrey City Centre and Newton; and
    • Future Phase 2 - Surrey-Langley Line: Fraser Highway between Surrey City Centre and Langley Centre. See the preliminary station map.

    Map with potential stations

    Preliminary station map of LRT